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20121121
20121129
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bomb." medical doctor, senator, and author, tom coburn on c-span and2. >> arizona senator john mccain called the zero obama's policy towards syria -- called the obama's policy toward syria shameful. this is just about one hour. >> good afternoon. the last session before lunch, the good guys, the special burden on democratic nations. we have a star-studded cast and i will hand it over to our moderator, kathleen koch. >> . ruhle for joining us today. the title of our panel in and of itself, "the good guys?" it reflects the self doubt that many of us have had today house we'll lot at a recent intervention in countries like iraq, afghanistan. we asked ourselves, were we the good guys? did we get it right? did we do the right thing? did we do more harm than good? in our panel today, i would like us not to look back, not to rehash the past, but let's look forward and really reflect on the lessons learned in these interventions and see how they can inform the actions of our communities of democracies as we move forward into the future. first, we have a panel that virtually needs no introduct
is at one of the largest political firms. since running the mccain campaign in 2008 he has been on campaigns around the world. and you saw him during the 2012 u.s. campaign. he was campaign manager for the landslide reelection of california governor in 2006. before that a top political advice sor in the white house of george w. bush. he attended the university of delaware from 1988 to 1993. david plouffe crossed paths in schmidt in the late 1980's. he completed his political seasons degree and finned two years ago. he has completed two presidential bids. he was appointed as a senior advice sor to the president in the white house in 2011. he attended is the marks high school before serving in a wide viret of state and national political campaigns. i'm going to ask the two speakers this evening to speak and i had to decide who is going to go first and i decided to use a standard that anyone this this audience could mean and that is whoever has won the most recent presidential election gets to speak first. i think that's the fair enough thing to do so please welcome david plouffe and steve schm
of the political parties who control their agendas. john mccain the original sponsor of the bill now denounces his own hanley work. will it's hope in the post election atmosphere this dynamic can change and mccain can proudly support his very own bill. let me close by saying i do think america is exceptional. it is the global melding pot, a place where the universal nation is being created. we may not do better in immigration than anyone before but we do assimilation better than anyone. people from all over the world come to this country and almost magically become real americans but part of being a real american is urging the country to look at its flaws and change them. let's get started. >>> as president obama readies for a second term, i wondered who could best shed light on the challenges he faces and how to deal with them. the president is an avid student of american history so i thought it was fitting to ask two great pulitzer prize-winning historians to sit down with me. robert carroll has written four biographies and jon meacham has a new book out on a twice elected president. the book is
office, and he is a very distinguished economist. he was john mccain's economic adviser in the first campaign. he's now running the american action forum, and he's one of the best hawks out there on fiscal issues, but he does it kindly. [laughter] and we have -- and then we have steve case who i just heard how's, you know, steve, i wanted to give him the chairmanship of the jobs council, but he said jeff immelt has that, but not for long. [laughter] so jeff immelt of ge. steve case, one of the founders and chairmen of aol. he is the chairman of revolution, he's very tied up in trying to think about what are the sparks that drive innovation, creativity, how do you drive young people here. so, michael, you've now been involved with a major study, a u.s. competitiveness project at the harvard business school, engaged thousands of people, thousands of voices, surveys, discussions with hundreds of economic leaders, and you've come up with an eight-point plan of things you're advocating. i've gone through it and, you know, some of it makes a lot of sense to me. and i guess it would have ma
the mccain scholarship program for challenged kids to get scholarships to go to private schools. when that thing was past 10 years ago, you had one member of the black caucus vote for it. when it came up for renewal last year, you have the majority of the black caucus and the hispanic caucus vote for it. and each of them said, we are doing this because it is helping our children. as we go forward, that has to be the order of the day for country. thank you all very much. and i appreciate your generosity. as i said, i love to next. i want to take some questions before we -- i love gen next. i want to take some questions before we wrap up. thank you. [applause] >> thank you, kevin, very much. i appreciate what you are doing for our country. my question is, in california, we have not adopted a charter schools and vouchers and choice as much as you have experienced in washington d.c. might experience is that once we introduced choice, the bar will rise four parts -- for public schools because then they have to keep up with the charter schools and the voucher schools that parents like to go
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)

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